Home > Cardiology > AHA 2019 > Trials in Electrophysiology and Left Ventricular Function > Carvedilol does not improve exercise performance in Fontan patients

Carvedilol does not improve exercise performance in Fontan patients

Presented By
Dr Ryan Butts, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, USA

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Conference
AHA 2019
Dr Ryan Butts (University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, USA) presented the results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial of carvedilol in single-ventricle patients with Fontan physiology [1]. The rationale behind the trial was that beta-blockers may ameliorate the increased circulating catecholamines in these patients and, consequently, improve their exercise performance; however, no difference was observed between the 2 arms. The study enrolled 26 single-ventricle patients between 10-35 years old with a previous Fontan operation who were able to complete a maximal exercise test (respiratory exchange ratio [RER] >1.0). Two 12-week treatment arms were separated by a period of 6 weeks for drug washout. Exercise testing was performed at the beginning and end of each treatment arm. Study drug was increased to a goal maximum dose (0.2-0.3 mg/kg/dose twice daily). The primary study outcome was an improvement in peak oxygen consumption/kg (p...


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